jamesfrancozpenis:

In 1968, during the administration of US President Lyndon B. Johnson, Eartha Kitt encountered a substantial professional setback after she made anti-war statements during a White House luncheon. Kitt was invited to the White House luncheon and was asked by Lady Bird Johnson about the Vietnam War. She replied: “You send the best of this country off to be shot and maimed. No wonder the kids rebel and take pot.”

During a question and answer session, Kitt stated:

The children of America are not rebelling for no reason. They are not hippies for no reason at all. We don’t have what we have on Sunset Blvd. for no reason. They are rebelling against something. There are so many things burning the people of this country, particularly mothers. They feel they are going to raise sons — and I know what it’s like, and you have children of your own, Mrs. Johnson — we raise children and send them to war.

Her remarks reportedly caused Mrs. Johnson to burst into tears and led to a derailment in Kitt’s career

she is amazing

(Source: solomonorsalamander)

1 week ago
75,334 notes

hellaciousbrother:

zftw:

me

somethings terribly wrong with this horse

(Source: dogsyoutube, via dreamsofgeddywithamachete)

2 weeks ago
12,217 notes
We write to taste life twice, in the moment, and in retrospection.
Anaïs Nin, The Diary of Anaïs Nin, Vol. 5 (1947-1955)

(Source: larmoyante, via breathingbooks)

3 weeks ago
5,442 notes
datsyukian-deke:

I love you, Zetterberg.

datsyukian-deke:

I love you, Zetterberg.

(via zetterblog)

3 weeks ago
49 notes

I’m a selfish book owner. 

A coworker’s house burned to the ground this week. She’s has two young sons and they lost nearly everything. The older son, 12, is having a hard time with it. He likes to read before going to bed but lost all of his books. If I can contribute anything, it is books, especially some awesome young adult books.

So I went home and started putting all of them in a box, over 50 books, but I started getting choked up looking at them all. Books that I have held on to since 5th grade, because I decided then they would always be my favorite. The first books I ever bought with my own money. The books my grandma bought for me, encouraging me to collect a library. A set of Roald Dahl books from a Scholastic order form in 4th grade. Wayside School, Jerry Spinelli, Walk Two Moons. The complete Series of Unfortunate Events, hardcover, first print, collected from sixth grade when the Bad Beginning came out in 1999 to the 13th installment when I was a senior in high school in 2006. A big part of me did not want to part with these books.

But I love these books so much because of hard times they helped me through. The difficult times of growing up awkward and unsure of myself and the escape these books brought. I never lost my home growing up. I never lost everything besides the clothes on my back. If these books can give him some sort of brief escape and maybe a bit of comfort, it is completely worth losing a chunk of my library for. I really hope he enjoys them.

1 month ago
0 notes

zarggg:

acupofteawithmy:

friendswithturkeys:

s-c-i-guy:

The Indispensable Genius of The Far Side

My favorite comics.

They were/are still one of my favorites. 

The Far Side has always been one of my favorite comics and this is exactly why.

(via punkrockgaia)

1 month ago
58,889 notes

thebsdboys:

A multitude of chill dogs, for your viewing pleasure.

(via thechocolatebrigade)

2 weeks ago
54,225 notes
the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

we need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay
“He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”
"The Galaxy, which had been enjoying a period of unusual peace and prosperity at the time, reeled like a man getting mugged in a meadow.”
"it was a deep, hollow malevolent voice which sounded like molten tar glurping out of a drum with evil on its mind.”
"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”
"… a large and voluminous creature who looked like someone losing a fight with a pink duvet …”
"He screwed up his face and then dropped his head forward, shaking it like someone trying to shake a coin out of a money box.”
"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”
"He leapt to his feet like an author hearing the phone ring”
"he started to stalk forward slowly and stealthily wearing a puzzled frown of concentration, like a leopard that’s not sure whether it’s just seen a half-empty tin of cat food half a mile away across a hot and dusty plain.”
"it looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”
"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

we need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay

He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”

"The Galaxy, which had been enjoying a period of unusual peace and prosperity at the time, reeled like a man getting mugged in a meadow.”

"it was a deep, hollow malevolent voice which sounded like molten tar glurping out of a drum with evil on its mind.”

"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”

"… a large and voluminous creature who looked like someone losing a fight with a pink duvet …”

"He screwed up his face and then dropped his head forward, shaking it like someone trying to shake a coin out of a money box.”

"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”

"He leapt to his feet like an author hearing the phone ring”

"he started to stalk forward slowly and stealthily wearing a puzzled frown of concentration, like a leopard that’s not sure whether it’s just seen a half-empty tin of cat food half a mile away across a hot and dusty plain.”

"it looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”

"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

(Source: pizzahottie, via fixyourwritinghabits)

2 weeks ago
94,525 notes
crumscrochet:

Bacon and Eggs Pillow by Moogly - free pattern!

crumscrochet:

Bacon and Eggs Pillow by Moogly - free pattern!

3 weeks ago
103 notes

yarn-over:

Step by step photos for Block a week CAL Block 9

I really like this challenge but there are things i really get stressed about too with finished block -_-; oh well im really hard to impress even if im the one who try this…

1 month ago
101 notes
kazard:

residentfeline:

how do cats even work

Cats:
A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.
A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
 Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.
The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.
Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.
And that’s how cats work.

kazard:

residentfeline:

how do cats even work

Cats:

  • A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
  • The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
  • The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
  • One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.
  • A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
  • A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
  • If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
  • A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
  •  Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.
  • The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.
  • Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
  • Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
  • A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
  • A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
  • Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
  • A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
  • A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
  • A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.

And that’s how cats work.

(Source: caturday, via catp0rn)

1 month ago
359,231 notes